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Most Palestinians and Israelis willing to accept two-state solution, poll finds

As some people claim here that majority of palestinian wish one state solution the question is what is possible and can be accepted.

Any peace agreement should include more the border deceleration it must include commitment for both nation to build a structure of confederation to deal with problems that relate to both people. Water, social justice, environment, security. which practically is a step toward confederation.

to end the Nakba now, within the next 3 years we need to move to a two-state stage.


source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/apr/22/israel-palestine-poll
Most Palestinians and Israelis willing to accept two-state solution, poll finds

Survey indicates around three in four would find outcome at least 'tolerable'
David Pallister (a senior Guardian reporter, specializing in investigations)


A majority of both Palestinians and Israelis are willing to accept a two-state solution, according to a poll from the international grassroots movement One Voice.

Based on public opinion research methods used in Northern Ireland, 500 interviews were completed in Israel and 600 in the West Bank and Gaza immediately following the Gaza war and the Israeli elections.

Each side was asked which problems they thought were "very significant" and what the solutions might be.

The results indicate that 74% of Palestinians and 78% of Israelis are willing to accept a two-state solution on an option range from "tolerable" to "essential", while 59% of Palestinians and 66% of Israelis find a single bi-national state "unacceptable".

The poll comes as it emerged Barack Obama is to invite Israeli, ­Palestinian and Egyptian leaders to the White House within the next two months in a fresh push for Middle East peace. Obama, speaking at the White House yesterday, said there was a need to try to rise above the cynicism about prospects for peace.

The results of today's poll imply that mainstream Israeli and Palestinian populations have yet to acknowledge the significant priorities and fears on the other side.

The top item for Palestinians is the establishment of an independent sovereign state at 97%, followed by the rights of refugees at 95% and agreement on the future of Jerusalem at 94%.

For Israelis the top item is security at 77%, followed by an agreement on the future of Jerusalem at 68% and rights to natural resources at 62%.

An analysis of the poll by One Voice says: "It is absolutely essential that the issues at the top of these two lists get dealt with in any peace agreement or it is unlikely that that agreement will last. This means Palestinians need to be aware of and address the 'Security of Israel' problem that comes in 12th on the Palestinian list, and that Israelis need to be aware of and address the cluster of issues at the top of the Palestinian list."

The poll also revealed significant divisions about the issues of settlements and refugees, on which there was no single proposed solution which met with majority approval on both sides. Ninety-eight per cent of Palestinians think that all the settlers should leave the occupied territories with the settlements abolished – an option that 53% of Israelis find unacceptable.

More than 90% of Palestinians want refugees to be given the right to return with compensation, while 77% of Israelis say that is unacceptable.

On Jerusalem, the sides are poles apart. The most attractive option for Palestinians – 95% – is for all of Jerusalem to remain in Palestine, and for Israelis it is for all of Jerusalem to remain in Israel at 56%.

The report says that "as these two options are mutually exclusive proposals to internationalise or divide the city also need to be considered".

One Voice concludes that, at a minimum, the results suggest that "the continued insistence of both sides on a negotiated and mutually acceptable resolution could offer significant legitimacy to political leaders looking to push for negotiations toward a two-state agreement".

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To read the poll you will see they have a lot of questions and people tend to be "negotiational" when they have such questions, you will see they tend to the extreme. same the Palestinians.

The poll conclusion is based on the whole questions and the image is more moderated when you take all the answers as implying different direction.

100% will wish one Jewish state where the Palestinians live as equals, but this is un real. and most of them know it.
the 30% who understand that the top priority is to end the Nakba from both sides will be the ones who bring change.

The results indicate that 74% of Palestinians and 78% of Israelis are willing to accept a two-state solution on an option range from "tolerable" to "essential", while 59% of Palestinians and 66% of Israelis find a single bi-national state "unacceptable".
is excellent results for the opportunity we have now to break the violence cycles.
Some people do not see that two state solution is what the majority wants
Neri Bar-On

My economics professor once told me that "figures lie and liers figure" when discussing economic data.


Israelis Clearly Oppose Two-State Solution
February 18, 2009

(Angus Reid Global Monitor) - A majority of Israeli adults oppose the formation of a Palestinian state neighbouring their own country, according to a poll by Maagar Mochot released by Channel 2. 51 per cent of respondents are against the establishment of an independent Palestinian state in Judea and Samaria, while 32 per cent support it.

The former British mandate of Palestine was instituted at the end of World War I, to oversee a territory in the Middle East that formerly belonged to the Ottoman Empire. After the end of World War II and the Nazi holocaust, the Zionist movement succeeded in establishing an internationally recognized homeland. In November 1947, the United Nations (UN) General Assembly passed a resolution calling for the formation of a Jewish state.

In 1948, the British government withdrew from the mandate and the state of Israel was created in roughly 15,000 square kilometres of the mandate’s land, with the remaining areas split under the control of Egypt and Transjordan. Since then, the region has seen constant disagreement between Israel and the Palestinians, represented for decades by the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO). Wars broke out in the region in the second half of the 20th Century, involving Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and Egypt.

Around 750,000 Palestinians fled or were forced to leave their territory during the 1948 Arab-Israeli war. The "right of return"—under which Palestinians aim to re-occupy their homes in Israel—has always been a questionable point in peace negotiations. Hundreds of thousands of refugees from the war and their descendants still live in shantytown camps run by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA), next to Gaza cities and towns.

During the six-day war in 1967, Israel gained control of the Sinai Peninsula, the Gaza Strip, the West Bank, eastern Jerusalem, and the Golan Heights.

Fatah leader Mahmoud Abbas is currently heading the Palestinian Authority from the West Bank, endorsed by Israel and most of the Western international community. Ismail Haniyeh of Hamas has become the de-facto leader in the Gaza Strip.

On Feb. 10, Israel held a legislative election. The outcome was too close to call, with the ruling Kadima and the rightist Likud party garnering roughly the same amount of votes. Israeli president Shimon Peres will ask either Kadima leader Tzipi Livni or Likud leader and former prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu to form a government.

Following the election, David Makovsky—director of the Washington Institute’s Project on the Middle East Peace Process—commented on the way a new government would deal with current situation, saying, "Livni deeply believes that a two-state solution is in Israel’s national interest based on the democratic threats of holding onto the West Bank. You don’t sense that with Bibi [Netanyahu]."

Polling Data

In light of the experience with disengagement, the Second Lebanon War and the war against Hamas in Gaza, do you support or oppose the establishment of an independent Palestinian state in Judea and Samaria?

Support 32%

Oppose 51%

Neither 8%

Not sure 9%

Source: Maagar Mochot / Channel 2
Methodology: Telephone interviews with 1,894 Israeli adults, conducted on Feb. 2 and Feb. 3, 2009. Margin of error is 4.5 per cent.
The article MOUSSA posted includes these 2 statements:

In November 1947, the United Nations (UN) General Assembly passed a resolution calling for the formation of a Jewish state.

Yes. UN General Assembly recommended a State for the Jewish People but could not and did not create that state. Only the inhabitants could create any States.

In 1948, the British government withdrew from the mandate and the state of Israel was created in roughly 15,000 square kilometres of the mandate’s land, with the remaining areas split under the control of Egypt and Transjordan.

The British withdrew in 1948. But is any of the rest of the above accurate in any way?
Well, I guess that everyone believes in the correctness of the data one believed in before one even found the data. It's a matter of minutes to find evidence that supports one's own viewpoint, and the primary reason why we are looking for this kind of 'scientific validation' (of our viewpoint) is predominantly to support our own viewpoint.

We should make a poll on the two-state-issue on mepeace (with only Israelis and Palestinians being invited to vote). But unfortunately there's, as far as I know, no convenient 'poll function' here.
Paul Reti,

Yes a very glaring error by a very reputable outfit such as Angus Reid.

I tried to find any independent polling done by the Palestinians themselves and could not find any on the subject on two states or one state. But based on related polls. a majority of Palestinians have no problem with armed attacks against Israel.

I am unsure how to read why no polls have been taken on the two or one state solution. Perhaps the pollsters have an inkling of the outcome and are afraid that the world may learn what they already know.
I have no info about the current polls. All is possible. The published Israeli polls are probably not doctored however a lot depends on exactly how the questions were worded. Everyone believes in motherhood.

One interesting example is the polling done before the Bart railway system was built in San Francisco. A very substantial majority of the residents were for it being built. Once it was built though almost noone used it for a long time and the traffic problems it was meant to solve remained, essentially unchanged.

They then polled people to find out what the problem was. Simple answer. Everyone was hoping that OTHERS (not themselves) would use public transport. Interesting....
Ana,

Did you notice you put one-side conditions?
What do you think Israel should do?

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